McAllen only city in the Valley with July 2018 unemployment rate of less than five percent, according to Texas Workforce Commission


McAllen only city in the Valley with July 2018 unemployment rate of less than five percent, according to Texas Workforce Commission

Featured: South Texas College held its annual Superintendents Leadership Academy on Monday, August 14, 2018. The event was a roundtable-style meeting with STC administrators and Valley leaders from partnering school districts to prepare for the school year ahead.

Photograph By JOSÉ GÓMEZ

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McAllen only city in the Valley with July 2018 unemployment rate of less than five percent, according to Texas Workforce Commission

By DAVID A. DÍAZ
Legislativemedia@aol.com

McAllen was the only city in the Rio Grande Valley with an unemployment rate of under five percent for the month of July 2018, according to the Texas Workforce Commission.

McAllen’s latest unemployment rate of 4.9 percent was followed closely by Edinburg, which reported an unemployment rate of 5.1 percent for the July 2018.

The unemployment rate is a key indicator of the strength of the local economy.

The July 2018 unemployment rates from the Valley’s most populated cities follow:

McAllen: 4.9 percent
Edinburg: 5.1 percent
Harlingen: 6.1 percent
Mission: 6.4 percent
Brownsville: 6.7 percent
Pharr: 7.7 percent
Weslaco: 8.5 percent

The state’s unemployment rate in July 2018 was 4 percent, compared with 4.5 percent in July 2017.

The U.S. unemployment rate in July 2018 was 3.9 percent, compared with 4.3 percent the same month the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of Labor (https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000).

The number of jobs in cities and counties statewide is independently documented by the Texas Workforce Commission, a state agency with many key duties, such as maintaining and reporting on key trends in state and local economies, including unemployment rates and the number of people employed in cities.

The unemployment rate is the number of persons unemployed, expressed as a percentage of the civilian labor force, according to the Texas Workforce Commission. The civilian labor force is that portion of the population age 16 and older employed or unemployed. To be considered unemployed, a person has to be not working but willing and able to work and actively seeking work.

According to the Texas Workforce Commission, for the month of July 2018, these are the employment figures for the seven largest cities in the Valley:

Brownsville: 70,623
McAllen: 62,231
Edinburg: 38,238
Mission: 31,819
Pharr: 27,966
Harlingen: 23,252
Weslaco: 14,402

Also according to the Texas Workforce Commission, the major cities in the four-county Valley have recorded the following monthly unemployment rates during 2018 and 2017:

McALLEN

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 4.9 percent
June: 5.1 percent
May: 4.5 percent
April: 4.8 percent
March: 5 percent
February: 4.9 percent
January: 5 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 4.4 percent
November: 4.5 percent
October: 4.4 percent
September: 4.7 percent
August: 5.4 percent
July: 5.4 percent
June: 5.4 percent
May: 5.1 percent
April: 5 percent
March: 5.4 percent
February: 5.8 percent
January: 5.8 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 5.1 percent

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EDINBURG

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 5.1 percent
June: 5.2 percent
May: 4.5 percent
April: 4.5 percent
March: 4.7 percent
February: 4.9 percent
January: 5.2 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 4.8 percent
November 2017: 4.8 percent
October 2017: 4.9 percent
September 2017: 5.3 percent
August: 6 percent
July: 5.7 percent
June: 5.6 percent
May: 4.9 percent
April: 4.8 percent
March: 5.4 percent
February: 5.9 percent
January: 6.1 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 5.3 percent

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HARLINGEN

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 6.1 percent
June: 6.4 percent
May: 6 percent
April: 5.8 percent
March: 6.1 percent
February: 6.2 percent
January: 6 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 5.4 percent
November: 5.9 percent
October: 5.5 percent
September: 5.9 percent
August: 6.7 percent
July: 6.7 percent
June: 6.6 percent
May: 6.2 percent
April: 6.3 percent
March: 6.8 percent
February: 7.1 percent
January: 7 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 6.4 percent

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MISSION

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 6.4 percent
June: 6.6 percent
May: 5.6 percent
April: 6 percent
March: 6.1 percent
February: 6 percent
January: 6.4 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 5.7 percent
November: 5.7 percent
October: 5.7 percent
September: 6.4 percent
August: 7.1 percent
July: 7.2 percent
June: 7.2 percent
May: 6.3 percent
April: 6.6 percent
March: 7.2 percent
February: 7.7 percent
January: 8.3 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 6.8 percent

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BROWNSVILLE

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 6.7 percent
June: 7.1 percent
May: 6.1 percent
April: 6.5 percent
March: 6.7 percent
February: 6.9 percent
January: 7.1 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 6.1 percent
November: 6 percent
October: 5.8 percent
September: 6.6 percent
August: 7.5 percent
July: 7.6 percent
June: 7.9 percent
May: 6.8 percent
April: 7.2 percent
March: 7.4 percent
February: 8.2 percent
January: 8.8 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 7.2 percent

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PHARR

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 7.7 percent
June: 7.9 percent
May: 6.7 percent
April: 7.4 percent
March: 7.5 percent
February: 7.6 percent
January: 8.3 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 7.1 percent
November: 6.9 percent
October: 6.4 percent
September: 7.6 percent
August: 8.9 percent
July: 8.7 percent
June: 8.9 percent
May: 7.6 percent
April: 7.8 percent
March: 8.5 percent
February: 8.8 percent
January: 9.8 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 8.1 percent

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WESLACO

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 8.5 percent
June: 8.5 percent
May: 7 percent
April: 7.4 percent
March: 7.2 percent
February: 7.3 percent
January: 8.6 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 8 percent
November: 7.2 percent
October: 6 percent
September: 7.3 percent
August: 9 percent
July: 9.2 percent
June: 8.8 percent
May: 7.2 percent
April: 7.1 percent
March: 7.5 percent
February: 8.2 percent
January: 9.7 percent

2017 Annual Unemployment Rate: 8 percent

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ADDITIONAL REGIONAL ECONOMIC STATISTICS

Also according to the Texas Workforce Commission, the four counties in the Rio Grande Valley have recorded the following monthly unemployment rates in 2018 and 2017:

HIDALGO COUNTY

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 6.9 percent
June: 7.2 percent
May: 6.2 percent
April: 6.6 percent
March: 6.9 percent
February: 7.1 percent
January: 7.6 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 6.6 percent
November: 6.3 percent
October: 5.9 percent
September: 6.8 percent
August: 7.8 percent
July: 7.8 percent
June: 7.9 percent
May: 7 percent
April: 7.3 percent
March: 7.7 percent
February: 8.3 percent
January: 9 percent

The annual combined unemployment rate for all cities in Hidalgo County for 2o17 was 7.4 percent.

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CAMERON COUNTY

July: 6.6 percent
June: 6.9 percent
May: 6 percent
April: 6.3 percent
March: 6.5 percent
February: 6.7 percent
January: 6.8 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 5.9 percent
November: 5.9 percent
October: 5.8 percent
September: 6.4 percent
August: 7.2 percent
July: 7.2 percent
June: 7.5 percent
May: 6.6 percent
April: 6.8 percent
March: 7.2 percent
February: 7.8 percent
January: 8.2 percent

The annual combined unemployment rate for all cities in Cameron County for 2o17 was 6.9 percent.

Also for July 2018, there were 318,033 individuals employed in Hidalgo County, while 156,025 persons were employed in Cameron County during the same month.

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STARR COUNTY

July: 10.2 percent
June: 11 percent
May: 9.6 percent
April: 10.7 percent
March: 10.8 percent
February: 11.4 percent
January: 12.2 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 10.1 percent
November: 9.4 percent
October: 8.7 percent
September: 9.7 percent
August: 10.9 percent
July: 11.4 percent
June: 11.9 percent
May: 11 percent
April: 12.6 percent
March: 13.4 percent
February: 14.7 percent
January: 15.7 percent

The annual combined unemployment rate in Starr County for 2o17 was 11.7 percent.

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WILLACY COUNTY

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2018

July: 11.5 percent
June: 11.8 percent
May: 11 percent
April: 11.2 percent
March: 11.1 percent
February: 11.4 percent
January: 11 percent

Monthly Unemployment Rate, 2017

December: 9 percent
November: 8.8 percent
October: 8.9 percent
September: 9.6 percent
August: 11.1 percent
July: 12 percent
June: 11.7 percent
May: 11.3 percent
April: 11.7 percent
March: 12.1 percent
February: 12.5 percent
January: 12.9 percent

The annual combined unemployment rate in Willacy County for 2o17 was 11 percent.

Also for July 2018, there were 22,895 individuals employed in Starr County, while 5,368 persons were employed in Cameron County during the same month.

Because of substantial methodology changes between 2004 and 2005 in estimating city unemployment statistics, Texas city data is not available prior to 2005, according to the Texas Workforce Commission.

Because of substantial methodology changes in geographic areas below the state level, data from 2005 and 2004 or earlier is not considered comparable, the state agency explains.

Effective in March 2015, the TWC also notes that “for all sub-state LAUS estimates, a break in series exists between December 2009 and January 2010 due to a change in methodology used. The use of caution is advised when comparing data from prior to 2010 to that of 2010-present.

The Texas Workforce Commission data on all entities in the state, including cities and counties, is available online at:

http://www.tracer2.com/cgi/dataanalysis/AreaSelection.asp?tableName=Labforce

SOUTH TEXAS COLLEGE, DUAL CREDIT PARTNERS OUTLINE THEIR PRIORITIES FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR AHEAD
 
Dual Credit Program staff at South Texas College say that Guided Pathways and accreditation will be the top priorities as they look ahead to a dynamic year collaborating with partnering school districts across the Valley.

STC held its annual Superintendents Leadership Academy on Monday, August 14, 2018. The event was a roundtable-style meeting with STC administrators and Valley leaders from partnering school districts to prepare for the school year ahead.

Superintendents at the leadership meeting included Mission CISD Superintendent of Schools Dr. Carol Pérez, Hidalgo ISD Superintendent Xavier Salinas, Edcouch Elsa ISD Superintendent Ronaldo J. Cavazos, Donna ISD Superintendent Dr. Hafedh Azaiez, and Mercedes ISD Superintendent Dr. Daniel Treviño.

Representatives from McAllen ISD, PSJA ISD, and Weslaco ISD were also in attendance.

STC President Dr. Shirley A. Reed gave the opening address, and the roughly two-hour meeting was moderated by Dr. Anahid Petrosian, Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs at South Texas College.

“Your partnership is what makes this program work. We just could not do it without you,” Reed told district leaders in attendance. “We are learning every day more and more about the successes of this program and we truly are the pioneers of dual credit here in the Valley.”

Since 2000, STC has served over 98,000 dual credit students tuition free. The Dual Credit program currently serves two counties, 23 school districts, 78 high school sites and includes over 12,000 students, 1,400 courses, and more than 500 faculty.

“We have the biggest program in the state and in the country,” Reed said. “We have learned so much through our partnerships and our experiences, and our Guided Pathways Initiative is our effort to help students get on a pathway and help them stay on a pathway. It is about encouraging them to stay on a pathway so they can get through the higher-ed pipeline and into the workforce or graduate school, whatever their aspirations might be. We are really quite proud of the accomplishments of our dual credit students.”

Topics at the Monday, August 14, 2018 meeting included discussions on the college’s Dual Credit programs, the statewide Guided Pathways Project, and a review of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between South Texas College and local partnering school districts, which outlines the roles for dual credit schools for the upcoming school year beginning Monday, August 27, 2018.

The MOU is the agreement that encompasses all dual credit programs, including early college high schools and academy programs as required by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

At issue for the upcoming school year is the Guided Pathways Project and working towards accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP). Accreditation by NACEP is a rigorous two-year process that will enable STC to become a model for all dual credit programs across the nation.

“Dual Credit Programs is supporting the Guided Pathways initiative, as we have been working to provide our students with the opportunity to align their high school endorsement with our meta-majors,” said Dr. Rebecca De León, Interim Dean for Dual Credit Programs and School District Partnerships. “As far as accreditation, NACEP is a national recognition which we are currently seeking as a college to apply for our program.

“No institution in the state of Texas has yet been awarded,” De León said. “We will document the process throughout the upcoming academic year, which provides us the opportunity to show that we are meeting the standards that are required for dual credit.”

Mercedes Superintendent Treviño says he is looking forward to the 2018-2019 school year because the coming year marks the first time STC will have professors on his district campuses, allowing students to sit in a college environment.

“This works with our schedule a little more efficiently,” Treviño said. “It’s very important for our students to be sitting in a college environment as we implement our new initiatives.

“It’s always a pleasure to visit with South Texas College. We have a tremendous partnership,” he said. “Our goal in Mercedes is to give our students as many opportunities as we can at our district, and post-secondary as well. We are always interested in seeing how we can run these programs a little more efficiently.”

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José Gómez contributed to this article.

Article provided by: http://titansofthetexaslegislature.com

 

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